Sunday, March 15, 2020

sexuality essay essays

sexuality essay essays Many experts agree that homosexuality has existed as long as human beings themselves, although the attitude towards them has undergone dramatic changes in some countries. Accepted by many societies during Greek and Roman era, most of the time homosexuals were considered to be sinners against nature and even criminals. In Medieval and modern periods homosexuals were prosecuted. Enlightenment brought some liberation, substituting death penalty by imprisonment. In Nazi Germany so-called "doctors" tried to "cure" gays by the ways of castration and extreme intimidation. Until 1973 attempts to find a cure against homosexuality, what by majority was viewed as a disease, were continued. Today, when research on twins suggests that sexual orientation is not a choice, but our genetic predisposition, homosexual acts are still considered to be immoral and even illegal in majority of countries and in the eyes of most religious groups homosexuals, probably, always will be the subjects of anathema. As much as the future may look gloomy for many gays and lesbians all over the world, there are remarkable changes in public opinion and officials attitudes toward homosexuals in some countries. For example, in 1989, Denmark was the first to allow the same-sex marriage. In the United States the subject of homosexuality remains controversial. For example, In Hawaii three homosexual couples asked the court to recognize their right to get married and the court did. However, the state government refused to legalize this marriage. Consequently, a new amendment was introduced to the state Constitution. At the same time, majority of the states are not even considering this option and homosexuality itself is still illegal there. Still, not only authorities try to determine the position they should take towards homosexuals, many common Americans also have no clear understanding of how to react to homosexuality. Why should we bother to find the answer to the ...

Friday, February 28, 2020

Self Magazine critic Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 words

Self Magazine critic - Essay Example The articles were usually based on elements that seemed quite fictional when considered to be applicable in real life. Needless to say, the cover page article on Keri Russell (Bried)was quite entertaining and one could not help but admit that the interview did indeed hold quite a degree of authenticity to it and a breath of fresh air when compared to a certain sense of artificialness that prevailed across the rest of the magazine (SELF Magazine). Articles such as Make good sex great (Pamela)and More Joy, Less Stress appeared to be amongst the major highlights of the issue and while one cannot feel that such article names are quite clichà © when considered in the backdrop of the modern day article names that are scattered across magazine covers, an brief overview of the articles proved that they were in fact quite unique in their narration and held a certain sense of honesty about them as if the author had not written them for mere commercial value and had not acquired the data used in the articles from a few second grade websites. Rather there was an undeniable feeling that no matter which perception the authors had kept in mind while writing the articles, one could not disagree on the fact that the knowledge of the writers regarding the subject matter of their articles was not something that one could doubt. Moving further on into the December issue of the much acclaimed magazine there was a pleasant picture that the magazine continued to present with articles such as 31 minutes to solve any shopping dilemma which was perhaps one of the few in the magazine that held a solid sense of reality and application in them. Other articles that were observed to possess a similar degree of applicable utility also included 8 One minute relaxers and 77 Easy ideas for doing good which were based upon a particular perception that was observed in not only this issue of the magazine but also in other issues of the magazine. The magazine ensured that not a single

Wednesday, February 12, 2020

Frankenstein history Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 words

Frankenstein history - Essay Example Despite the horrifying elements that the book contains, most people are for the fact that the book is a work of science. As Victor is seen joining the university at Ingolstadt, he creates a monster, a grotesque act committed by him, which removes him far from the victory of committing a scientific triumph. He attempts to go beyond accepted human limits of knowledge in order to create secrets not known to mankind. The story behind Frankenstein thus may be viewed as a lesson about the search for knowledge as well as the dangerousness that accompanies the pursuit. This paper helps to provide an insight into Mary Shelley’s characterisation of Victor and helps to portray his role as an admirable scientist and also delves into the subject of whether or not some lines should be crossed when it comes to understanding human science. Victor Frankenstein grew up in Geneva and moved to the University at Ingolstadt to understand the secrets of human life. He was extremely interested in and inquisitive about the ‘secret’ life of humans and wanted to pursue the discovery of the creation of mankind. The entire novel has been written by Shelley from the perspective of three protagonists as the novel begins with Robert Walton writing letters to his sister, within which he includes the story of the creation of the monster, Frankenstein. It is Victor’s obsession for wisdom that led him to the predicament that he was caught up in when Walton found him at the North Pole, almost dead. The story thus is in the form of a narrative by Victor, which then takes the form of an epistolary as Walton writes it to his sister. Victor gave rise to a grotesque monster which he called Frankenstein. The monster eventually killed his youngest brother, his best friend as well as his wife, and caused a few other deaths which brought great remorse and grief upon the scientist. Despite the ramifications of his weak judgement in creating a source of destruction, Victor was not able to admit the guilt of his creativity as he transforms into a disillusioned man on the path of destroying the fruits of his own career and ambitions. Throughout the story, the author emphasises on the lack of humanness that he possesses. She depicts this throughout various instances, for example, right in the beginning, when Victor refuses to marry Elizabeth despite the marriage being his dying mother’s last wish. He leaves the poor girl and flees to the university. Even after creating a monster which ends up killing his loved ones, he does not stop to think about his emotions and gives no comfort to his feelings. Thus, by these incidents, one may witness that the character of Victor was not very admirable. However, throughout the beginning when Victor had a focus on science and wanted to go about a certain way, his traits with respect to his goals and ambitions were very admirable. As the reader moves further into the story, Victor moves farther away from his emotions an d feelings, giving the reader a sense of feeling putrid for his admirableness. Victor Frankenstein could thus be deemed as a stoic man, incapable of feeling for people around him. He proved the same by giving into his scientific curiosity and letting go of the people he loved sub consciously. Upon creating the monster, he left horrified by what he had done, and this made the monster feel confused and afraid as well. This shows relentless ambiguity on Victor’s character as he is not able to stick to his decisions or make up his mind regarding what he wants. Victor’s narrative has been deemed upon by a number of critics as a reliable source of information because it comes straight from the little emotions that he was able to muster up and talk about. He tells the story to Walton in a very matter of fact manner, stating everything he

Friday, January 31, 2020

Principles of Distillation Essay Example for Free

Principles of Distillation Essay What is distillation? Simply, distillation is the process in which a liquid is vaporized (turned to steam), recondensed (turned back into a liquid) and collected in a container. Nature uses a form of distillation to turn salt water (seawater) into fresh water (rain). Why do you use distillation to recycle waste solvents? Solvent-based waste contains volatile material (solvents) and non-volatile material (contaminants like paint, ink, grease, fiberglass, etc.). Many of the non-volatile contaminates are dissolved in the solvent (like salt dissolved in salt water) and cannot be filtered-out. Distillation is an ideal way to separate the two. Why is distillation an ideal way to separate the two? During the distillation process, the solvent-based waste is heated until it reaches the boiling point. It then evaporates (vaporizes) and passes through the condenser where heat is removed from the vapor and it turns back into a cool, clean reusable liquid (same process that causes dew to form). Fortunately, contaminates are typically not volatile (easily vaporized) and stay behind in the distillation tank. You say contaminates are typically not volatile, does this mean some are? Occasionally there are cases where a potential customer wishes to separate a volatile solvent from another volatile material. This is not the typical customer. Some cases include customers using an alcohol to remove water from parts to dry them or where they have solvent mixtures due to poor house keeping practices (they lump all waste solvents into one drum from different operations like painting and parts cleaning). To separate one volatile from another effectively requires fractional distillation; our process uses simple distillation. What are the differences between simple distillation and fractional distillation? Simply stated, in simple distillation, what you put in is what you get back, but it is free of non-volatile materials (it is clean!). Fractional distillation is much more complicated (and expensive). It is the base process where crude oil is turned into the many items that come from oil. Fractional distillation is not required for virtually all solvent recycling applica tions. What is vacuum distillation? Vacuum distillation is the distillation of a liquid under reduced pressure. The atmospheric pressure in the distillation tank is reduced making it possible to boil the liquid at a lower temperature. Liquids boil at lower temperatures under reduced pressure (the inverse is that a liquid boils at a higher temperature under pressure, which is why they use a pressure cap on an automobile radiator to increase the boiling point of the engine coolant to prevent boil-over). Why do you use vacuum distillation? Vacuum distillation is used to safely recover higher boiling point solvents. We limit the maximum temperature of the distillation unit’s heater. There is a temperature at which a flammable or combustible material can ignite by temperature only, this is called the autoignition temperature (this is discussed later). Some solvents boil at temperatures that exceed the temperature that the distillation heater can reach (392 º Fahrenheit). Vacuum distill ation lowers the boiling point to allow recovery within the heaters maximum setting. When do you use vacuum distillation? It is used to safely recover solvents with boiling points over 300 º Fahrenheit. Vacuum distillation should not be used on solvents with boiling points below 200 º Fahrenheit. If the maximum heater setting is 392 º Fahrenheit, why do I need to use vacuum distillation for solvents with boiling points over 300 º Fahrenheit, don’t you mean solvents with boiling points over 392 º Fahrenheit? No! When boiling a liquid, two factors come in to play. One is the requirement to have a â€Å"driving force† to force the liquid to boil and vaporize. This â€Å"driving force† is in the form of extra temperature to allow the solvent to develop a good rolling boil. The other factor is the role of the non-volatile residue. As you boil off solvent and the remaining mixture in the distillation tank becomes more concentrated in the nonvolatile material, the vapor pressure drops (Raoult’s Law) and most important, the boiling point goes up! So bottom line is that you need 50 to 100 degrees of extra temperature to do a good job of boiling the waste solvent. Also, the concentrated non-volatile material acts as an insulator towards the end of the process as it becomes more and more concentrated. So, as the percentage of non-volatiles in the contaminated solvent increases, the required heat to completely distill the mixture also increases. Sometimes solvents that have boiling points of 318 ºF (Xylene) may not require a vacuum if they are not highly contaminated but almost definitely would if the solid content was greater than, lets say 10%. Pulling a vacuum on such a mixture will reduce its boiling point and the overall time to process it. How is the vacuum created? The vacuum is generated using our JetVac technology. A stainless steel reservoir is primed once with clean solvent. A small stainless steel pump is immersed in the liquid and is attached to an explosionproof electric motor. When the motor is started, clean solvent is drawn into the pump and forced through a metal tube known as an aspirator. The aspirator looks like an open piece of pipe with a small orifice (hole) on one side. As the high velocity fluid is pumped across the face of the orifice, it creates suction (like a venturi on a carburetor). Air is pulled through the venturi from the distillation system and passes through a vent.

Thursday, January 23, 2020

Slavery in Colonial America :: Slavery Essays

Slavery in Colonial America The first arrivals of Africans in America were treated similarly to the indentured servants in Europe. Black servants were treated differently from the white servants and by 1740 the slavery system in colonial America was fully developed. Slavery as it existed in America was a practice founded on the chattel principle. Slaves were treated as human chattel to be traded, sold, used, and ranked not among beings, but among things, as an article of property to the owner or possessor. Because the American slave system was based on this principle of human chattlehood, slaves were confined in many ways that handicapped them from even being able to act or live as a human being. The very idea of human chattelhood gave the master unlimited control over his defenseless slave. Chattels are not permitted to get married, acquire or hold property. Chattels cannot have rights and hence the slave has no rights. Chattels can be bought and sold and so justifies the existence of the slave trade. Chattels do not have any claim to legal protection, therefore the slave has none and must tolerate the cruelties of slavery. Chattels are not to be educated or instructed in religion. And lastly, chattels do not possess the freedom of speech and of the press. Race was a very important factor in American slavery. In other nations, slaves would be of the same race as their master. An ex-slave could re-enter society with their past forgotten and be accepted once again. On the other hand, American slavery was closely connected to racial differences that led to racial segregation and discrimination. Master and slave could physically be distinguished from one another, which ultimately distinguished one as human and the other as chattel. Before the American Revolution, slavery existed in every one of the colonies. But by the last quarter of the 18th century, slavery was eventually abandoned in the North mainly because it was not as profitable as it was to the South (where it was becoming even more prevalent). Slavery was an extremely important element in America's economy because of the expanding tobacco and cotton plantations in the Southern states that were in need of more and more cheap labor. At one point America was a land of 113, 000 slaveholders controlling twenty million slaves. By the 1760's many Americans were beginning to become dissatisfied with their mother nation and were waging a war of resistance against the British colonial government. Slavery in Colonial America :: Slavery Essays Slavery in Colonial America The first arrivals of Africans in America were treated similarly to the indentured servants in Europe. Black servants were treated differently from the white servants and by 1740 the slavery system in colonial America was fully developed. Slavery as it existed in America was a practice founded on the chattel principle. Slaves were treated as human chattel to be traded, sold, used, and ranked not among beings, but among things, as an article of property to the owner or possessor. Because the American slave system was based on this principle of human chattlehood, slaves were confined in many ways that handicapped them from even being able to act or live as a human being. The very idea of human chattelhood gave the master unlimited control over his defenseless slave. Chattels are not permitted to get married, acquire or hold property. Chattels cannot have rights and hence the slave has no rights. Chattels can be bought and sold and so justifies the existence of the slave trade. Chattels do not have any claim to legal protection, therefore the slave has none and must tolerate the cruelties of slavery. Chattels are not to be educated or instructed in religion. And lastly, chattels do not possess the freedom of speech and of the press. Race was a very important factor in American slavery. In other nations, slaves would be of the same race as their master. An ex-slave could re-enter society with their past forgotten and be accepted once again. On the other hand, American slavery was closely connected to racial differences that led to racial segregation and discrimination. Master and slave could physically be distinguished from one another, which ultimately distinguished one as human and the other as chattel. Before the American Revolution, slavery existed in every one of the colonies. But by the last quarter of the 18th century, slavery was eventually abandoned in the North mainly because it was not as profitable as it was to the South (where it was becoming even more prevalent). Slavery was an extremely important element in America's economy because of the expanding tobacco and cotton plantations in the Southern states that were in need of more and more cheap labor. At one point America was a land of 113, 000 slaveholders controlling twenty million slaves. By the 1760's many Americans were beginning to become dissatisfied with their mother nation and were waging a war of resistance against the British colonial government.

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Napoleonic Era

The French Constitution of the Year VIII was a nationwide charter that was adopted on the twenty-fourth of December, 1799.   Around that time, the French Revolution was coming to coming to an end.   It also marked the eighth year in the calendar of the French Revolution.   This constitution was well known for the innovation of the type of government branded as Consulate.   One of the premises of the constitution is to get the consensus of the general public to weigh on opinion for the masses. This constitution was responsible for fabricating the position of First Consul, a position which gave Napoleon Bonapart the authority of a tyrant (Connely, 2000). Effectivity This constitution was effective for a short time and was later amended into the Constitution of the year X, a constitution that made Napoleon Bonaprte the First Consul for the duration of his lifespan.   The constitution that succeeded was blatantly favored to Bonaparte as it did not come with a Declaration of Rights (cited in Crook, 2007). How Bonaprte amended the constitution and rose to Power The Constitution of the year VIII basically divides the French Government into three parts.   First of which is the senate; it is composed of 31 men with an age bracket of 60 and above.   The second is the Tribunate; which is comprised of 100 men.   Last the Core Legislatif; this division is formed by 300 legislators.   However, though the government has three divisions, the authentic power resides in the First Consul, much similar to the totalitarian concept of Julius Caesar’s rule, which is peace through tyranny (Connely, 2000). References Connely, O. (2000). The Frecnh Revolution and Napoleonic Era.   Texas: Harcourt. University of North Carolina Greensboro (2002). French History Timeline. Retrieved November 17, 2007 from http://www.uncg.edu/com/sources/dafein/civ/timeline.htm The Napoleon Series (1995-2002). Government and Politics.   Constitution of the year VIII.   Retrieved November 17, 2007 From http://www.napoleon-series.org/research/government/ legislation/c_constitution8.htm

Tuesday, January 7, 2020

Uses and abuse of drugs - 983 Words

â€Å"Last year alone, 37,000 people died from drug related overdoses.† Many people do not understand why or how other people become addicted to drugs. Substance abuse is a growing problem that not only affects the person who is abusing alcohol or drugs but also affects the lives of those who are close to the abuser. Substance abuse is the abuse of any substance. A drug is a substance that modifies one or more of the body’s functions when it is consumed. It is often mistakenly assumed that drug abusers lack moral principles or willpower and that they could stop using drugs simply by choosing to change their behavior. In reality, drug addiction is a disease and quitting takes a lot more than just changing your behavior. Drug Abuse is generally†¦show more content†¦Some people are more susceptible than others in that their reward responses are stronger which is why some people will get addicted to things more easily than other people will. If you add to that a tr oubled background of some sort, then when the brain offers its reward response though making that person feels calmer and happier or more in control, they are more likely than someone who is pretty happy. Alcohol is made of ethanol, it is a depressant, your body becomes addictive to the depressant effects and you eventually need it to stop the shakes (delirium tremors) and the withdrawals of the depressant effects on the brain and body. For example, caffeine is a stimulant, and people become addicted to that and when having caffeine withdrawals one has headaches and other neurological effects. However, alcohol is a lot more dangerous because if you are a hardcore not only can you die from drinking, if you stop cold turkey you can have convulsions and die from withdrawals. The â€Å"addictive substance† is ethanol. When you are pregnant, it is important that you watch what you put into your body. Consumption of illegal drugs is not safe for the unborn baby or for the mother. S tudies have shown that consumption of illegal drugs during pregnancy can result in miscarriage, low birth weight, premature labor, placental abruption, fetal death, and even maternal death. If its suspected that woman whose pregnant is using drugs they will test the baby to see if its born addicted,Show MoreRelatedPrescription Drug Use And Drug Abuse1691 Words   |  7 PagesPrescription drug abuse is an ongoing problem in rural teens. The National Survey on Drug Use and Health suggests that 13% of teens between the ages of 12-17 have experimented with nonmedical prescription drugs at some point in their lives. Researchers have identified several factors linked with nonmedical prescription drug use such as their school enrollment status, history of depression, and a two parent household presence (Gever, 2010). Nonmedical prescription drug abuse has been the rise, inRead MoreThe Ethics of Drug Use and Drug Abuse1579 Words   |  6 PagesEthics of Drug Use and Drug Abuse For any professional working in the substance abuse treatment field, they will very likely come across situations and be presented with dilemmas relating to personal beliefs, judgments, and values. Drug or substance use and abuse have been a controversial and heated topic around the world for centuries. Drug abuse, in a way, is a facet of human culture that has been present for a great deal of human history in general. Every culture handles the issue of drug abuseRead MoreTreatment Of Drug Use And Drug Abuse Essay2194 Words   |  9 Pages According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (2012), the intention of drug addiction treatment is to help addicted individuals stop compulsive drug use and drug-seeking behavior (p. 8). 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In addition toRead MoreAnti Drug Use And Abuse1413 Words   |  6 PagesThe twentieth century was filled with illegal drug use and abuse among people from all walks of life including the rich and famous to the humble housewife and everyone in between. The type of drugs that were popular changed during the century and in return the views on them from society changed with them. Legislation had to continually be updated in order to keep up with the times as well. In the 1952 Dwight Eisenhower was elected President of the United States and his administration started toRead MoreDrug Use And Abuse Of Marijuana1299 Words   |  6 Pages There are several people in our society that have undergone a difficult time in their period which has resulted in the use of illegal substances. In today’s society there are people who would say that the use of marijuana is a result of bad parenting, while others claim that it is due to their surroundings. 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Nationally, addiction and abuse of all substances costs the economy an estimated $600 billion dollars annually. Indeed, over the past decade, illicit drug use appears to be steady or rising (2011 National Survey on Drug Use and Health; DHHS). From this we see that prescription and non-prescription opioid use is particularly problematic. For example, prescription pain reliever misuse has remained consistentlyRead MoreDrug Use And Abuse With Teenage Children2286 Words   |  10 PagesWhen tackling the hard subject of drug use and abuse with teenage children there are many tactics a parent can use to address the subject with their children. First it is important for the parent to be informed of the hard facts so that they can convey the appropriate information to their kids. First explaining the legal side of using drugs is beneficial in raising the children’s awareness of repercussions that can be associated with experimenting with drugs. 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